“Chibi Vampire” novel 1

Posted by DiGiKerot in Novels at July 6, 2007 on 7:18 pm

Please just hang on a moment whilst I laugh at Tokyopops renaming of Karin again…

That’s better.

Anyway, I think anyone who reads this site on a regular basis knows I don’t really get along with gag anime given that I tend to mention the fact that pretty much every viable opportunity (like I’m doing here). I don’t really have the same issue with gag manga though – I quite like the stuff. I buy Keroro as soon as a new English volume hits, and I’d say the same about Yotsuba& if there was actually a consistent release schedule. Karin, on the other hand, I started reading because I had this book to read.

I do actually kind of like Karin now, though. It is genuinely true that I picked up the first two volumes of the manga just so I’d have the background necessary to give a fair impression of this book, but I have bought more since. That isn’t to say it’s particularly great – if nothing else, the artwork is weaker than you’d generally expect from a series like this, but it is kind of fun.

Which is pretty much what I’d say about the novel. You’d be fairly silly if you were going into a manga spin-off manga like this expecting anything of any substantial quality, but Karin does manage to be better than you would expect. A lot of that is probably down to the fact that it manages to capture the humour of the series about as well as you could in text form – it’s a fun read. Nothing big, certainly nothing clever, but fun.

What it isn’t, however, is something you’d want to read without being familiar with the manga already. This is definitely one for those who are already following the manga and want to supplement their reading a little. Aside from the fact that it only makes minor considerations for those who aren’t familiar with the characters, the book does fit fairly snugly continuity wise between events in the second volume of the manga. Whilst the events of the novel are only really mentioned in passing in the manga, it is essentially series canon – anyone who gets really anal about knowing everything about a given series will probably want to read this.

As for other features worth commenting on, the art is done by Yuna Kagesaki, the original author of the Karin manga. The art isn’t particularly great – some of it is OK, whilst some of it is pretty awful.

So, in summary, it’s at least worth a look if you are an existing Karin fan. If not, you can feel content knowing you aren’t missing anything by not reading it.


Adam
2007-07-08
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I know this is not the right place, and please delete this post after you read it, but I was wondering, with all the F/SN figures you purchase, have you ever come across a tiny cracks between the joints, i.e. between the bottoms and the leg, or perhaps hair that is not properly seperated, i.e. small bits of plastic at the nearest point. I would be extremely grateful to a reply. Feel free to add me to MSN as well. Thanks in advance, I’m really at my wits end.


DiGiKerot
2007-07-08
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Well, PVC figures are generally assembled from several parts – even the larger, pre-assembled 1/6-1/8 figures are made of maybe a dozen pieces, which are then assembled by hand rather than it being an automated process. Tiny cracks between joins isn’t that common, but it isn’t uncommon either (particularly in bootlegs) – it’s just a result of badly put together figures. It’s for reasons like this that a lot of Japanese figure collectors try to wait as long as possible before picking a figure up, as the quality increases as the manual labour gets used to assembling particular figures.

Even the best assembled figures will have seam marks and indentations, if not quite cracks, though. It’s simply near impossible to mass assemble multiple parts and have things lining up perfectly.

As for the second one, it’s generally either a result of poor molding or “flash” (accidental overspill during the production process). It’s particularly common in bootlegs, where aside from the manufacturing being poor, they use disassembled versions of a retail figure to create their molds. Being two molds away from the original sculpt means a loss in detail.

With hair being the pointy-est parts on most figures, it’s simply where things like this tend to be the most visible. A lot of figures, particularly smaller ones like gashapon and trading figures, tend to have soft points at the end of the hair.

Unfortunately, there’s not much you can do to avoid these things other than buying figures from the reputable companies like Goodsmile, Alter, Max Factory and Kotobukiya, and probably avoid Yujin’s stuff, since by the time reviews come out a lot of figures are near impossible to source ^^;


Adam
2007-07-09
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Weep, it’s official then, I’ve been duped. Knew I shouldn’t have gone through with it when he said the “sticker fell off”. Ah well, live and learn. Thanks for the info!


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